International Fellowship of Christians and Jews

The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews was founded in 1983 to promote understanding and cooperation between Jews and Christians and to build broad support for Israel and other shared concerns. Our vision is that Jews and Christians will reverse their 2,000-year history of discord and replace it with a relationship marked by dialogue, understanding, respect and cooperation.
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Posts tagged "rabbi eckstein"

Take a moment to read Rabi Eckstein’s end-of-year message: A Year of Giving Life and Hope http://bit.ly/1k0xA5B 

Take a moment to reflect with today’s devotional: http://bit.ly/19pqa4K 

Take a moment to reflect with today’s devotional: http://bit.ly/19pqa4K 

Shalom, friends! Take a moment to reflect with The Fellowship with today’s devotional:  http://buff.ly/JM6jTR

Shalom, friends! Take a moment to reflect with The Fellowship with today’s devotional:  http://buff.ly/JM6jTR

Ethiopian Sigd Holiday - 2012 on Flickr.

Earlier this month, members of the Ethiopian Jewish community in Israel celebrated Sigd, a holiday unique to Ethiopian Jews that honors the renewal of the alliance between the people, God, and the Torah. Sigd, which always falls 50 days after Yom Kippur, is a time for the Ethiopian Jews to examine their hearts and amend any behaviors not pleasing to God. To read more about this holiday, visit: http://bit.ly/V1r65W
Photo: Michal Fatel

Faces of the Fellowship: These rambunctious children live in Ethiopia and are hoping to someday become citizens of Israel. Until they can reach their new home they live in a Fellowship transit camp where we make sure they have the food, education, security, and medical care they need.

Faces of the Fellowship: These rambunctious children live in Ethiopia and are hoping to someday become citizens of Israel. Until they can reach their new home they live in a Fellowship transit camp where we make sure they have the food, education, security, and medical care they need.

Israel comes to a standstill to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah)

theisraelproject:

Women in Israel make headlines from behind the tanks to in the labs. Check out the story of Naama Geva-Zatorsky, 34, who now lives in Massachusetts but grew up in central Israel and attended Tel Aviv University.
From JTA today:
JERUSALEM — She’s young, smart and aims to help treat life-threatening diseases.
Naama Geva-Zatorsky, 34, is among a growing group of Israeli women gaining recognition for their contributions to scientific research.
The Weizmann Institute biologist was in Paris last month to accept the International UNESCO L’Oreal Prize for Women in Science. Dubbed “Europe’s top young researcher” by the prize committee, she received a two-year, $40,000 fellowship for her postdoctoral work at Harvard University.
The selection committee cited the “excellence and the originality of her work.”
Geva-Zatorsky’s research focuses on probiotics, which are commonly known as “good bacteria” and have the potential to treat a variety of diseases.

theisraelproject:

Women in Israel make headlines from behind the tanks to in the labs. Check out the story of Naama Geva-Zatorsky, 34, who now lives in Massachusetts but grew up in central Israel and attended Tel Aviv University.

From JTA today:

JERUSALEM — She’s young, smart and aims to help treat life-threatening diseases.

Naama Geva-Zatorsky, 34, is among a growing group of Israeli women gaining recognition for their contributions to scientific research.

The Weizmann Institute biologist was in Paris last month to accept the International UNESCO L’Oreal Prize for Women in Science. Dubbed “Europe’s top young researcher” by the prize committee, she received a two-year, $40,000 fellowship for her postdoctoral work at Harvard University.

The selection committee cited the “excellence and the originality of her work.”

Geva-Zatorsky’s research focuses on probiotics, which are commonly known as “good bacteria” and have the potential to treat a variety of diseases.


(via theisraelproject-deactivated201)

Rabbi Eckstein went to one of the largest absorption centers in Israel, where he celebrated, together with his friend and hero Natan Sharansky, a mock Seder meal to teach newly-arrived Ethiopian immigrants about Pesach (Passover). Indeed, The Fellowship is sponsoring Passover Seders this Friday night in 16 absorption centers for almost 6,000 Ethiopian Jews who recently immigrated to Israel. In addition, The Fellowship works closely with the Jewish Agency in helping care for the future immigrants during their wait for aliyah, bringing them to Israel, and helping them in their resettlement process. For more photos of this mock Seder visit our Flickr set.